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Article
December 1951

REPOSITIONING THE MANDIBLE IN CASES OF OBSTRUCTIVE (LOW TONE) DEAFNESS AND TINNITUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Assistant Professor of Human Anatomy, Temple University School of Dentistry, member of the staff of St. Joseph's Hospital and St. Agnes Hospital, and Chief of Staff, Mount Sinai Hospital, Philadelphia.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;54(6):632-638. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750120025004
Abstract

AGREAT deal has been written about repositioning the mandible in cases of obstructive deafness and tinnitus. The problem has been studied by dentists, otologists, anatomists, and physiologists.

Costen and other investigators have reported their findings as to the validity of lost vertical dimension as a cause of obstructive deafness and tinnitus. Vertical dimension may be defined as the proper relationship between the maxilla and the mandible. There have been many opinions both pro and con, and each investigator has made a strong case for his side of the question. The fact remains, however, that dentists have been able in many cases, by the closest cooperation with the otologist, to carry through to a successful conclusion relief of tinnitus and deafness of the obstructive type by proper adjustment of the bite or, as we shall refer to it, by proper repositioning of the mandible. The literature in dentistry and otology contains

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