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Article
January 1952

EFFECTS OF OXYGEN DEPRIVATION UPON THE STRUCTURE OF THE ORGAN OF CORTI

Author Affiliations

PRINCETON, N. J.
From the Princeton Psychological Laboratory. This research was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, under Contract N6-onr-270, T. O. 3, Project NR 140-322. Permission is granted for reproduction, translation, publication, use, and disposal in whole or in part by or for the United States Government.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1952;55(1):31-37. doi:10.1001/archotol.1952.00710010038005
Abstract

ONE OF the biological processes most resistant to oxygen deprivation is the generation of electrical potentials by the cochlea when this structure is stimulated by sound. But careful laboratory studies on animals have shown that under extreme anoxia deterioration in this process is obtained. In an earlier study1 it was found that in the cat no changes in the potential take place when the amount of oxygen in the inspired air exceeds 4% but a mixture slightly more dilute than this causes an impairment of the recorded potentials. As respiration continues with this dilute mixture, the impairment progresses until a steady state is reached which may then be maintained for hours, as though the animal had adjusted to this low oxygen condition. A further decrease in the percentage of oxygen produces a further decrease in potential, rapid at first and again leveling off at a lower value. It is

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