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Article
May 1952

OSTEOGENIC SARCOMA METASTATIC TO THE NASAL MUCOSA

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1952;55(5):586-588. doi:10.1001/archotol.1952.00710010600009
Abstract

OSTEOGENIC sarcomas are those in which the tumor parenchyma displays recognizable differentiation of bone or osteoid tissue. They occur most frequently in men in the 10 to 30-year age group. The primary site in 65% of cases is in the lower limbs near the ends of the bones where growth momentum is greatest. Injury has been regarded as a cause of osteosarcoma, but the evidence is inconclusive. Microscopically, the appearance ranges from fully differentiated bone to anaplastic spindle cells devoid of recognizable osteoblastic differentiation. Willis1 states that metastases to the lungs appear in a large proportion of cases. They may also appear in the skin, liver, brain, and other bones. Lees2 in 1947 reported the first case of osteosarcoma metastatic to the choroid. Review of the literature for the past 17 years fails to reveal any case metastatic to the regions covered in the field of otorhinolaryngology. For

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