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Article
October 1952

NONCHROMAFFIN PARAGANGLIOMA (GLOMUS JUGULARE TUMOR) OF MIDDLE EAR

Author Affiliations

SALT LAKE CITY
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Utah School of Medicine, and Holy Cross Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1952;56(4):378-384. doi:10.1001/archotol.1952.00710020400004
Abstract

MORE THAN 100 years ago Valentin1 described a swelling surrounding the ramus tympanicus of the glossopharyngeal nerve in its course through the tympanic canal which he designated the "gangliolus tympanicus."

In 1878 Krause2 wrote concerning this swelling around the ramus tympanicus, describing a vascular tissue consisting of "a foundation of connective tissue with elastic fibers; it contains arteries, veins and net-like capillaries. The arteries are branches of the ramulus tympanicus out of the A. pharyngea adscendens, which is 0.12 mm. thick and accompanies the N. tympanicus. The former vascular tissue is characterized by a larger or smaller number of three-sided pyramid-shaped or star-shaped perithelial cells of 0.007-0.015 mm. in diameter, the nuclei of which are about 0.004 mm." Also, "at times these cells can pile up around the twisted vessels in such a way that utricular formations suggest the structure of the G. intercarotica." He suggested the name

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