[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1952

CLINICAL EVALUATION OF TRACHEOTOMY IN RESPIRATORY COMPLICATIONS OF POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

HOUSTON, TEXAS
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Baylor University College of Medicine, and the Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center of the Jefferson Davis Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1952;56(4):385-404. doi:10.1001/archotol.1952.00710020407005
Abstract

WITH THE development of the tank respirator by Drinker,1 in 1929, the problem of management in the spinal form of poliomyelitis with respiratory insufficiency was so improved that many patients lived and often were rehabilitated to a useful life. The value of this apparatus cannot be overemphasized, but its usefulness in treating patients with the bulbar and bulbospinal forms of the disease was questioned. Wilson,2 in 1931, felt that it had little, if any, benefit in the treatment or management of these forms of the disease and that it might increase the hazard. In 1932, Wesselhoeft and Smith3 used the respirator in 30 cases and observed that it had little or no value in the bulbospinal and bulbar cases.

It has been recognized that a great many of the patients with the bulbar form, if they recovered, had little or no residual paralysis. Anderson4 has shown

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×