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Article
October 1952

SURGICAL INTERRUPTION OF THE ANTERIOR ETHMOID ARTERY IN SEVERE EPISTAXIS: Report of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

LOUISVILLE, KY.
From the Veterans Administration Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1952;56(4):448-451. doi:10.1001/archotol.1952.00710020470012
Abstract

NOTWITHSTANDING the empirical fact that about 90% of all nosebleeds will be controlled usually by simple methods, there are a number of cases in which persistent bleeding necessitates the surgical interruption of a major artery.

As the subject of epistaxis has been discussed exhaustively by such authors as Ogura and Senturia,1 Harkins,2 and Hallberg,3 a detailed description of the etiology, treatment, and other aspects of the problem will be omitted here.

The blood supply of the nose is derived from branches of the external carotid artery via the internal maxillary and sphenopalatine vessels, as well as from the internal carotid artery by way of the ophthalmic artery and its branches, the anterior and posterior ethmoidal vessels.

There exist a number of reports of ligations of the common and/or the internal carotid artery, sometimes followed by disastrous results. Publications regarding the ligation of the external carotid artery have

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