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Article
June 1953

AUDITORY TUBE AND TYMPANIC CAVITY DURING EMBRYONAL, FETAL, AND PRENATAL LIFE: Histologic Study

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1953;57(6):627-647. doi:10.1001/archotol.1953.00710030651004
Abstract

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  KOPPEN,1 who first studied the ear of newborn infants, believed the tympanotubal cavity to be filled with "more or less thickened liquid during the embryonal life." Von Troeltsch2 was the first to recognize that the bony middle ear is occupied by a jelly-like mass. He suggested that the mass decreased by a progressive surface desquamation. Zaufal3 believed the decay of the contained mass to be due to a purulent destruction and synovial-like liquefaction. On the basis of histological studies, Wendt4 suggested that the reduction of the gelatinous mass is due to a rapid loss of intercellular fluid and that the resorption of the fluid is activated by the first influx of air into the tube with the initial respiratory movement.Aschoff5 examined macroscopically and histologically 86 premature and stillborn infants and 9 fetuses. His material was transported from Hannover to Goettingen,

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