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Article
July 1953

CLINICAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO NEUROTOXICITY OF STREPTOMYCIN GROUP OF DRUGS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1953;58(1):55-61. doi:10.1001/archotol.1953.00710040072007
Abstract

THE MOST important complications arising from the therapeutic use of streptomycin and dihydrostreptomycin are severe damage to the vestibular and cochlear mechanisms. Dihydrostreptomycin, which is hydrogenated streptomycin, has no therapeutic advantage over streptomycin. It was developed with the hope that it might not produce the vestibular and cochlear complications which are so frequent with the parent drug.

These antibiotics are most frequently employed by the chest physician, the general surgeon, and the urological surgeon; the otolaryngologist relatively rarely employs these agents in his practice. The otolaryngologist is, however, frequently consulted with regard to the vestibular and cochlear complications but, unfortunately, in many instances after streptomycin or dihydrostreptomycin therapy has been started or has been in progress for two or more weeks. For example, a patient who has received 1 gm. of streptomycin on one day finds that he is unable to hear his watch tick in the left ear the

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