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Article
April 1954

SURGERY OF THE SYMPATHETIC IN MÉNIÈRE'S DISEASE, TINNITUS AURIUM, AND NERVE DEAFNESS: A New Concept in Acute Fulminating Ménière's Disease

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;59(4):492-498. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00710050504008
Abstract

THE PURPOSE of this paper is threefold. First I should like to present certain general considerations regarding the complex entity of Ménière's syndrome; second, to discuss a new concept, and, third, to record experience with stellate block and dorsal sympathectomy.

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS  Ménière's syndrome, with its completely incapacitating vertigo, its distracting tinnitus, and the accompanying likelihood of irreversible nerve deafness, has presented to otologists one of their major problems. The number of patients with irreparable eighth nerve deafness who consult us constantly give eloquent and grim testimony to the fact that thus far we have failed to meet the challenge of Ménière's syndrome.We are indebted to Ménière for his description of the symptoms of vertigo, tinnitus, and deafness, characterizing this labyrinthine deviation, and for locating the lesion in the labyrinth. The pathology, however, which he described was labyrinthine bleeding, which is a condition far afield from our present-day concept

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