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Article
August 1954

BENIGN GIANT-CELL TUMORS OF SKULL AND NASAL SINUSES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Otolaryngology Service of Beth Israel Hospital, Dr. M. Som, Attending Otolaryngologist.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;60(2):186-193. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00720010192008
Abstract

THE ORIGINAL description of giant-cell tumors of bone appears to be buried in several centuries of medical literature, the first case description being variously ascribed to Ambroise Paré1 in the 16th century and to Sir Astley Cooper in 1818.2 Giant-cell tumors are fairly common lesions in the long bones, small bones, jaws, and vertebrae of young adults. They appear to be only rarely encountered above the level of the nasal sinuses, since only scattered cases have been reported of their occurrence in the various nasal sinuses, temporal bone, frontal bone, occipital bone, and nasal septum.9

Meyerding3 classifies these tumors as (1) benign and (2) malignant, with further subdivision of the latter into primary and secondary. He makes a further comment that "it is recognized that, after treatment, a benign giant-cell tumor may become malignant." It is of interest that a survey of the literature reveals synonyms

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