[Skip to Navigation]
Article
August 1954

AUDITORY MALINGERING AND PSYCHOGENIC DEAFNESS: Comments on a New Test and Some Case Reports

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE
From the Department of Speech, University of Washington.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;60(2):197-201. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00720010203010
Abstract

The literature on hearing testing is replete, not to say overburdened, with tests for nonorganic hearing loss, usually labeled "malingering tests." We have found over 40 such tests in the literature, including the well-known Stenger, Lombard, and Doerfler-Stewart as well as the less well-known Hummel, Dolger, Becker, and Tschudi tests. Successive authors have pointed to the many more clinical signs, not dignified by the name "test" but nevertheless indicating the possibility of faked deafness in the patient who complains of hearing loss. Among such signs are included the unreliability of repeated audiograms, inconsistencies in speech and hearing responses, presence of conditioned responses, and many others. There would seem to be little point in discussing a new "malingering test" in these pages unless it can be shown that the need for better diagnostic measures in this realm still exists.

Unfortunately, the need for more reliable examination procedures does exist for nonorganic

Add or change institution
×