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Article
September 1954

VERTIGO (MÉNIÈRE) FOLLOWING RADICAL MASTOIDECTOMY TREATMENT BY TYMPANIC PLEXECTOMY: Report of Cases

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;60(3):302-304. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00720010311004
Abstract

THE PURPOSE of this paper is to describe recurring Ménière-like attacks of vertigo in five cases following radical mastoidectomy. The episodes of vertigo persisted from a few months to several years after the radical mastoidectomy. In two of the cases the healing was complete. In three cases there was persistent slight mucoid discharge. In all five cases the vertigo, nausea, and vomiting, etc., ceased after section of the tympanic plexus. The radical mastoid operations were performed by other surgeons for chronic suppuration without labyrinthine involvement. In all five cases taste was absent on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue on the side of the operation because of division of the chorda tympani nerve. The ear not operated on was normal.

The five patients ranged in age from 40 to 53 years and described their vertigo as follows: (1) sudden onset of rotatory vertigo lasting a few minutes to a few

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