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Article
November 1954

DIFFERENCE LIMEN AND RECRUITMENT

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; TURKU, FINLAND; ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine and Central Institute for the Deaf. This study was supported by the Hofheimer Audiology Laboratory and a grant (B-243) from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness of the National Institutes of Health.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;60(5):525-540. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00720010540001
Abstract

THE NEED for the measurement of recruitment is apparent in the speed with which "recruitment tests" have been provided by manufacturers of audiometers and are incorporated in clinical routines, even before sufficient validating work has been done. This need presumably arises in connection with diagnosis. No one doubts by now that the presence of recruitment is indicative of a nonconductive hearing loss. Furthermore, if the thesis of Dix, Hallpike, and Hood1 is substantiated, even finer diagnoses can distinguish between cochlear and retrocochlear pathologies.

Recruitment is defined primarily as a more-rapid-than-normal increase in subjective loudness for a given increase in physical intensity. It is most readily explored, according to this definition, by the binaural loudness balance, described originally by Fowler.2 In this technique one measures the intensities of two tones (one presented to the left, the other to the right ear) when the listener reports that they sound equally

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