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Article
January 1955

STENOSIS OF THE ESOPHAGUS AND STOMACH FOLLOWING THE INGESTION OF CORROSIVE SUBSTANCES

Author Affiliations

Medical Corps, United States Army
From the Otolaryngology Service, Department of Surgery, Letterman Army Hospital, San Francisco.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1955;61(1):2-8. doi:10.1001/archotol.1955.00720020015002
Abstract

PYLORIC obstruction may result from the swallowing of corrosive substances. It is not generally known that this complication may occur.

When alkalies or acids are taken into the mouth in sufficient concentration, the appearance of a burn about the mouth may be noted; and if these substances are swallowed, the whole alimentary tract may become involved, and marked corrosion and perforation may result. If the patient survives the immediate effects, there usually results fibrosis of the esophageal and gastric mucosa, with subsequent choking-off of the gastric glands and altered digestion.1 If this fibrosis is severe enough, stricture results, and the severity of the stricture is dependent upon the extent and depth of the fibrosis. Cicatricial areas in a large lumen, such as the fundus of the stomach, may cause no obstruction, whereas the same amount of scarring in a narrow lumen, such as the esophagus or pylorus, may cause

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