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Article
February 1955

ADEQUATE SURGERY FOR EXTENSIVE CARCINOMA OF THE PHARYNX, LARYNX, AND CERVICAL ESOPHAGUS: The Problems Encountered

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1955;61(2):181-196. doi:10.1001/archotol.1955.00720020195006
Abstract

ONE OF the most distressing clinical problems encountered by the laryngologist is the patient afflicted with a far-advanced neoplasm of the pharynx, larynx, or cervical esophagus. If his end is not hastened by widespread metastasis, pulmonary complications, or massive hemorrhage from an eroded vessel wall, the patient ultimately undergoes two surgical procedures, viz., a tracheotomy to provide an airway and a gastrostomy to provide nutrition. In any event, if the course of the disease is not arrested, the patient faces a period of suffering and discomfort such as is seen in few other conditions.

Encouraged by the successes achieved in the surgical treatment of intrinsic carcinoma of the larynx and by the progress made in dealing with lesions of the lower esophagus, surgeons have been devoting their attention to the surgical treatment of tumors involving the pharynx, larynx, and cervical esophagus with extension to adjacent structures, particularly the lymph nodes

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