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Article
February 1955

MOBILIZATION OF THE STAPES FOR OTOSCLEROTIC DEAFNESS: Preliminary Report on Two Years' Experience

Author Affiliations

New York
From the Otolaryngological Service, Mount Sinai Hospital (Dr. Rosen); Hunter College (Dr. Bergman).

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1955;61(2):197-206. doi:10.1001/archotol.1955.00720020211007
Abstract

MOBILIZATION of the ankylosed footplate of the stapes in otosclerotic deafness has been employed for the past two years to restore hearing. The following report of this work is presented at this time to answer two questions which are basic in the evaluation of any surgical technique for the relief of deafness: first, can the operation restore socially useful unaided hearing; and second, will the restored hearing last?

In a recent publication one of us (S. R.)1 described a method of palpating the stapes as a means of determining suitability for fenestration. This was done through an ordinary ear speculum in the external auditory canal with the area under local anesthesia. After the lower half of the drum membrane was elevated and the incudostapedial joint exposed, the degree of fixation of the stapes was determined by palpating it with a probe.

On April 3, 1952, the above procedure of palpation of the stapes in a case of otosclerotic deafness suddenly resulted in a return of acute hearing. It seemed that while this fixed stapes was being palpated the footplate was accidentally mobilized. This patient had been carefully studied in several audiology centers prior to this incident and had been found to be ideal for the fenestration operation. Hearing tests made shortly after the mobilization of the stapes revealed normal hearing, which has been maintained to the time of this writing. This case (Case 1, E. L.) is described fully in the Report of Cases.

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