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Article
July 1955

RECURRENT SWELLING OF THE TONGUE DUE TO CIRSOID ANEURYSM (ANGIOMA)

Author Affiliations

Los Angeles

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1955;62(1):90-92. doi:10.1001/archotol.1955.03830010092014
Abstract

SWELLING of the tongue often presents a difficult problem in diagnosis and, consequently, treatment. The usual conditions considered in a differential diagnosis such as trauma, allergic states, infection, or neoplasm are usually readily evident and will indicate the treatment of choice. It should be added that systemic diseases such as cretinism and acromegaly should be kept in mind as being associated with macroglossia. Less obvious, and often puzzling, are cases where the tongue swelling is periodic and recurrent but transient in character. In the interval between attacks of swelling, the tongue appears relatively normal.

Among the noninfectious and nonmalignant conditions causing enlargement of the tongue, the angiomas represent a group of special interest and significance. Although not infrequent in the skin and mucosa, they are relatively rare when confined to the tongue. Various details of their clinical manifestations and pathological nature are still obscure. Every new report about

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