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Article
August 1955

PEMPHIGUS OF THE OROPHARYNX AND LARYNX: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Jewish Hospital, Service of Dr. Samuel Weinstein.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1955;62(2):214-217. doi:10.1001/archotol.1955.03830020096017
Abstract

PEMPHIGUS1 is defined as an acute or chronic disease of the skin occurring in several phases and sometimes accompanied by constitutional symptoms. It is characterized by bullae that develop in cycles or in continuous succession. There are several forms, but the commonest form occurring in this country is pemphigus vulgaris.

The lesions of pemphigus are bullae of various types and their sequels. By successive crops the disorder is continued over weeks, months, or years. The mucous membranes of the mouth and vagina may become invaded, and not infrequently the first manifestations of the disease are presented in the former situation.

The important histopathologic finding is acantholysis. This is a disappearance of the intercellular bridges of the epidermal cells.

St. Clair Thomson2 says that pemphigus affecting the mucous membrane of the mouth and larynx is a rare affection. He says it is generally secondary to the skin eruption, but

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