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Article
July 1958

HEARING LEVEL, HEARING LOSS, AND THRESHOLD SHIFT

Author Affiliations

Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, Mo.
1100 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y.
Wright Air Development Center, Dayton, Ohio

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1958;68(1):119-120. doi:10.1001/archotol.1958.00730020123011

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Abstract

To the Editor: The following excerpt from our recent paper in the A. M. A. Archives of Industrial Health entitled, "The Medical Principles of Monitoring Audiometry" (Davis, H.; Hoople, G., and Parrack, H. O.: A. M. A. Arch. Indust. Health 17:1-20, 1958), speaks for itself.

"Hearing Level, Hearing Loss, and Threshold Shift.—The familiar term 'hearing loss' includes three quite distinct concepts, and much confusion and many unnecessary arguments have occurred in court rooms, in committee rooms and in clinics because of this semantic monstrosity. These three concepts are (1) the otological meaning—symptom indicating an abnormal condition of hearing, (2) the audiological meaning: the status of hearing as measured by a reading in decibels on the hearing-loss dial of an audiometer, and (3) the common sense meaning—a change for the worse in the sensitivity of hearing. It has been particularly difficult in medicolegal situations to reconcile the second

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