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Article
January 1968

SENSITIVITY TO TOOTHPASTE

Author Affiliations

195 Macquarie St Sydney, Australia

Arch Otolaryngol. 1968;87(1):109-110. doi:10.1001/archotol.1968.00760060111023

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Abstract

To the Editor.—I would like to comment on the cause and therapy of the "Pathologic Quiz Case" with the diagnosis: acute and chronic inflammation of epiglottis (Archives, July 1967).

Fifteen years ago a young female patient came to see me complaining of painful swallowing for a few days. Indirect laryngoscopy showed an ulcer with hyperemic periphery and covered by a membrane-like exudate on the left arytenoid eminence. I had the impression that it must have been caused by some external agent because of the localization.

After days of observation and questioning of the patient she volunteered that she uses chlorophyll toothpaste and to be sure that she has no halitosis she also uses the foam of the toothpaste twice daily to gargle. I asked her to immediately stop the use of any toothpaste, gargle, or lozenge. In three days the pain disappeared and the ulcer healed. A dermatologist made

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