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Article
November 1968

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 1966

Arch Otolaryngol. 1968;88(5):556-563. doi:10.1001/archotol.1968.00770010558019
Abstract

IT WOULD SEEM fitting that the 1966 Progress Report on Plastic Surgery begin with the Archives of Otolaryngology's vignette on Sir Harold Guillies. Negus1 states that this famous otolaryngologist "More than any other person was instrumental in the founding of plastic surgery as a specialty." Guillies' monumental personal efforts to foster progress were exemplary, but many of the early plastic surgeons were secretive or mercenary about devulging their methods. This restriction to the dissemination of knowledge and exchange of critical evaluation slowed early progress in this field. Today, most of this individual obstruction is gone. But friction has developed between specialties interested in plastic surgery about the head and neck. There is a great need for cooperation and sharing of knowledge among the regional plastic surgeons (otolaryngologists, ophthalmologists, maxillofacial surgeons) and the general plastic surgeons.

Goldman2 struck this very theme in his inaugural address as first president of the American

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