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Article
April 1976

Resident's Page

Author Affiliations

Baylor College of Medicine and The Methodist Hospital, Houston

Arch Otolaryngol. 1976;102(4):254-256. doi:10.1001/archotol.1976.00780090096019
Abstract

PATHOLOGIC QUIZ CASE 1 

John R. McFarlane, MD, Houston  A 68-year-old man had a five-year history of hoarseness. Suspension laryngoscopy and a biopsy specimen taken in 1971 revealed a T1 squamous cell carcinoma of the left true vocal cord. He was treated with 6,000 rads, during a six-week period, through parallel opposed fields. He did well until his hoarseness recurred in April 1974. During the next eight months, he underwent laryngoscopy and biopsy of the left vocal cord on four separate occasions. Despite meticulous mucosal excision at the site of recurrent carcinoma in situ during the third and fourth procedures, the lesion again recurred. He then underwent a left hemilaryngectomy (Fig 1 to 3).What is your diagnosis?

PATHOLOGIC QUIZ CASE 2 

Steven M. Parnes, MD, Pittsburgh  A 37-year-old man had nasal obstruction. Two months prior to admission, he was treated for bilateral conductive deafness due to serous

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