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Article
April 1979

Resident's Page

Author Affiliations

University of Virginia School of Medicine Charlottesville, Va

Arch Otolaryngol. 1979;105(4):226-229. doi:10.1001/archotol.1979.00790160060017
Abstract

PATHOLOGIC QUIZ CASE 1 

Terry P. Templeton, MD, Houston  A 39-year-old man, who smoked 20 packs of cigarettes per year, complained of progressive hoarseness for two months. There was no pain, cough, or hemoptysis. On examination, a 1.0 cm × 0.5-cm mass was noted on the mid-to-posterior portion of the left true cord. The vocal cords were mobile, and no palpable masses were noted in the neck. The results of the remainder of the otolaryngic and physical examination were unremarkable. Direct laryngoscopy showed a nonulcerated smooth mass with indistinct margins; the mass was totally removed at the time of laryngoscopy. The pathologist was concerned that the lesion was well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The case was referred for a second opinion. Sections of the excised tissue are seen in Fig 1 through 3.What is your diagnosis?

PATHOLOGIC QUIZ CASE 2 

Robert Kenevan, MD; Richard Wingert, MD; Leonard L. Hays, MD, 

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