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Article
December 1982

Handbook of Plastic Surgery

Arch Otolaryngol. 1982;108(12):808-809. doi:10.1001/archotol.1982.00790600052016

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Abstract

Books on plastic surgery frequently begin with reflections on the origin of the technique, usually in the form of references to Suśruta's forehead flap reconstruction of noses (circa 400 bc) amputated for adultery. The books then progress to modern techniques to improve the appearance of the nose and other bodily parts in persons who hopefully will not become guilty of adultery because of their newfound beauty. The techniques are usually explained with lucid line drawings showing incisions laid out with a geometric precision that would make a mathematician proud. The books are then filled with reams of before (ugly) and after (beautiful) photographs of attractive women between the ages of 20 and 40 years who have benefited from the technique espoused (implied but not always stated) and performed by the author.

The only complications shown are those perpetrated elsewhere and referred to the author for rescue just before these patients

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