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Article
June 1989

Production of Lymphokine-Activated Lymphocytes: Lysis of Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine (Drs Alessi, Hutcherson, and Mickel) and West Los Angeles Veterans Administration Medical Center (Dr Mickel), Jonnson Comprehensive Cancer Center (Dr Mickel), and West Los Angeles Veterans Administration Medical Center Cancer Center (Dr Mickel), Los Angeles, Calif.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1989;115(6):725-730. doi:10.1001/archotol.1989.01860300079022
Abstract

• Lymphokine-activated killer cells are thought to be important mediators of host tumor defense. In the present study, the cytotoxic potential of lymphokine-activated lymphocytes against different head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Lymphokine-activated killer cells were derived from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Effector peripheral blood lymphocyte cell suspensions were incubated in the presence or absence of recombinant interleukin-2. Cytotoxicity of incubated cells or fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in a 3-hour chromium 51 release assay. Target cell lines included K562 (a natural killer–sensitive target) and the following head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines: Cal 27, UMSCC-1, UMSCC-8, UMSCC-16, UMSCC-19, and UMSCC-22a. Fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes and peripheral blood lympho

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