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Article
October 1989

Blood Viscosity and Hearing Levels in the Caerphilly Collaborative Heart Disease Study

Author Affiliations

From the Medical Research Council Institute of Hearing Research (Scottish Section), Glasgow, Scotland (Dr Gatehouse); the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit Cardiff (South Wales) (Drs Gallacher and Yarnell); the University Department of Medicine, University of Glasgow (Dr Lowe); the Department of Hematology, Royal Infirmary, Cardiff, Wales (Dr Hutton); and the Institute für Wasser-, Boilen-, und Lufthygiene, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin, West Germany (Dr Ising).

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1989;115(10):1227-1230. doi:10.1001/archotol.1989.01860340081022
Abstract

• Data from 342 men who are participants in the Caerphilly Collaborative Heart Disease Study were used to replicate a previous report of a significant relationship between measures of whole-blood viscosity and hearing levels in persons with sensorineural hearing impairment. In the unselected data, there were significant relationships between measures of whole-blood viscosity at high shear rates and hearing threshold levels at 2000 and 4000 Hz, even after accounting for the effects of age and socioeconomic group. In a subset of the data containing 124 persons selected on the basis of likely sensorineural hearing impairment, there were significant relationships between wholeblood viscosity and hearing level at all frequencies, with stronger effects at the higher frequencies. The data support the contention of a potentially important relationship between whole-blood viscosity and sensorineural hearing impairment.

(Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1989;115:1227-1230)

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