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Article
February 1991

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Author Affiliations

University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991;117(2):224-227. doi:10.1001/archotol.1991.01870140112019
Abstract

PATHOLOGIC QUIZ CASE 1  Jean M. Loftus, MD; Charles N. Ford, MD; G. Reza Hafez, MD, Madison, WisAn otherwise-healthy 14-year-old white girl was referred for evaluation of an asymptomatic left-sided neck mass noted on routine physical examination. She denied dysphagia, odynophagia, recent upper respiratory infection, ear problems, and systemic symptoms. The length of time the mass had been present was unknown.Physical examination revealed a 4 × 3-cm firm, smooth, mobile, non-tender mass, without associated adenopathy, erythema, or induration. The findings of the remainder of the examination were normal.A computed tomographic scan (Fig 1) demonstrated a solid-appearing, well-circumscribed, homogeneous mass deep to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Routine laboratory values were unremarkable.A left neck exploration was performed with excision of a 4 × 3 × 2-cm solid, encapsulated, tan, rubbery mass. No nearby structures were involved, and the findings of the remainder of the exploration were normal. Figures 2

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