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Article
August 1993

Winter Meeting of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Author Affiliations

Shreveport, La

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;119(8):908-909. doi:10.1001/archotol.1993.01880200114017

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Abstract

The following reports are from the 1993 Winter Meeting of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery held at the Boca Raton (Fla) Resort on January 15 and 16, 1993.

Since 1975, nasal continuous positive airway pressure has been used as the primary mode of respiratory support in infants at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. Short, wide nasal prongs are used to increase the airflow, which reduces the incidence of upper and lower airway complications. The presentation by Jeffery Ahn, MD, discussed the complications of this method, which resulted in nasal deformities from pressure necrosis. These include alar and vestibular stenosis as well as columellar notching and transection. Treatment consists of scar revision and/or composite grafting followed by padded nasal stenting for 2 months.

A historical overview of the cleft lip nose preceded the report of a series of revision cleft lip rhinoplasties by Wayne Larrabee, Jr, MD

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