A Nasal Critical-Size Defect: An Experimental Model for the Evaluation of Facial Osseous Repair Techniques | Facial Plastic Surgery | JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery | JAMA Network
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Original Article
August 1998

A Nasal Critical-Size Defect: An Experimental Model for the Evaluation of Facial Osseous Repair Techniques

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery (Drs Lindsey, Franz, and London, and Mr Toung), Neurological Surgery, Plastic Surgery, and Cell Biology (Dr Ogle), University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998;124(8):912-915. doi:10.1001/archotol.124.8.912
Abstract

Objective  To create a standardized nonhealing defect of craniofacial, minimal load–bearing, endochondral type bone with geometric properties that are amenable to quantitative and biomechanical testing that can be used to develop new osteoconductive and osteoinductive engineering repair techniques.

Design  Before-and-after randomized trial of an anatomical description.

Subjects  Twenty-four retired male breeder Sprague-Dawley rats.

Methods  A standardized osseous defect was created by removing the nasal bones with a cutting burr to the level of the nasal mucosal membranes. The defects were not repaired, and groups of 8 animals were examined using planimetry, computed tomographic scanning, and histological analysis at 1, 3, and 6 months following surgery to quantify defect repair.

Results  Mean repair rate by surface area measurements at 1, 3, and 6 months was 5.75%, 4.89%, and 7.09%, respectively. Results from histological analysis revealed that the defects were filled with fibrous tissue. Computed tomographic scans showed the bone defect without repair.

Conclusion  This nasal osseous defect fulfills criteria to be considered as a critical-size defect that can be used to investigate new techniques for bone reconstruction.

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