Enhancement of Cisplatin Sensitivity in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Transfected With a Survivin Antisense Gene | Cardiology | JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery | JAMA Network
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Original Article
June 2006

Enhancement of Cisplatin Sensitivity in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Transfected With a Survivin Antisense Gene

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Otorhinolaryngology (Drs Kojima, Iida, Yaguchi, Suzuki, and Moriyama) and Urology (Dr Hayashi), and Division of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of DNA Medicine (Dr Manome), Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2006;132(6):682-685. doi:10.1001/archotol.132.6.682
Abstract

Objective  To study a new method for treating squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck using a survivin antisense gene.

Design  An adenoviral vector encoding surviving antisense was used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. KB cells were treated with pAd.CMV[cytomegalovirus]-antisurvivin. Western blot analysis, in vitro cytotoxic assay, and in vivo experiment were performed.

Setting  In vitro and in vivo study of head and neck cancer cell line KB.

Subjects  Male, 5-week-old BALB/c nude mice.

Main Outcome Measures  Expression of survivin was assessed using Western blot analysis. The effect of antisurvivin to KB cells was measured by cytotoxic assay (in vitro) and tumor volume (in vivo).

Results  In the in vitro experiments, transduction of the survivin antisense gene caused a nearly 12-fold increase in the sensitivity of KB cells to cisplatin, as reflected by the 50% inhibitory concentration. In in vivo experiments in nude mice, tumor growth was more inhibited by the combination of cisplatin and survivin antisense gene transduction compared with either alone.

Conclusion  These findings suggest that survivin targeting with adenoviral antisense vectors might be used for selective therapy of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

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