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Original Article
July 19, 2010

Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Tongue in the Pediatric Age Group: A Matched-Pair Analysis of Survival

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Head and Neck Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;136(7):697-701. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.94
Abstract

Objective  To compare outcomes of a pediatric cohort of patients compared with a matched cohort of adult patients, all diagnosed as having squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue. Outcomes of oral cancer in pediatric patients have not been studied, to our knowledge.

Design  Retrospective matched-pair cohort study.

Setting  Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Patients  A total of 10 pediatric and 40 adult patients diagnosed as having SCC of the oral tongue.

Main Outcome Measures  Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS).

Results  The 5-year OS was equivalent in the 2 groups: 70% in the pediatric group and 64% in the adult group (P = .97). The 5-year DSS was also equivalent: 80% in the pediatric group and 76% in the adult group (P = .90). The 5-year RFS was 70% in the pediatric group and 78% in the adult group (P = .54).

Conclusions  When pediatric and adult patients were matched for sex, tobacco use history, TNM status, surgical procedure, and adjuvant radiotherapy, outcomes for OS, DSS, and RFS were equivalent. Pediatric patients with SCC of the oral tongue should be treated similarly to adult patients.

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