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Original Article
February 21, 2011

Free Jejunal Patch Graft for Reconstruction After Partial Hypopharyngectomy With Laryngeal Preservation

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Divisions of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Drs Miyamoto, Sakuraba, and Asano) and Head and Neck Surgery (Drs Hayashi, Ebihara, Miyazaki, Daiko, and Shinozaki), National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, and Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Dr Kimata), Japan.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(2):181-186. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.245
Abstract

Objectives  To examine postoperative complications and swallowing function associated with free jejunal patch graft transfer after partial hypopharyngectomy with laryngeal preservation.

Design  Retrospective medical record review.

Setting  Academic research.

Patients  A consecutive series of 43 patients who underwent free jejunal patch graft transfer after partial hypopharyngectomy with laryngeal preservation composed the study sample. They represented the following 3 groups based on the type of hypopharyngeal defect: 13 patients with defects of the posterior wall (PW group), 28 patients with defects extending to the unilateral piriform sinus (PS-PW group), and 2 patients with defects extending to the bilateral piriform sinuses (PS-PS group).

Main Outcome Measures  Postoperative complications and oral intake ability were compared among the groups.

Results  Except for 1 patient, all the patients in the PW and PS-PS groups resumed oral intake within 2 weeks after surgery. Four patients in the PS-PW group had severe dysphagia, 2 of whom could not discontinue tube feeding.

Conclusions  Free jejunal patch graft transfer after partial hypopharyngectomy allows satisfactory swallowing function, with a low complication rate. Postoperative dysphagia was slightly more common in the PS-PW group than in the PW group.

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