[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

August 2019 - January 1925

Decade

Year

Issue

April 18, 2011, Vol 137, No. 4, Pages 317-417

Reflections

Memoriam for Frank N. Ritter, MD

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):323. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.30
Clinical Note

Penetrating Globe Injury During Infraorbital Nerve Block

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):396-397. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.239

Arachnoid Cyst: Middle Ear Mass Diagnosis to Consider

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):398-400. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.31

Endoscopic Treatment of Plastic Bronchitis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):401-403. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.43
Clinical Problem Solving: Radiology

Radiology Quiz Case 1

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):404. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.40-a

Radiology Quiz Case 3: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):404-409. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.42-b

Radiology Quiz Case 2

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):405. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.41-a

Radiology Quiz Case 3

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):406. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.42-a

Radiology Quiz Case 3

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):406. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.42-a

Radiology Quiz Case 1: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):407. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.40-b

Radiology Quiz Case 3: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):409. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.42-b
Clinical Problem Solving: Pathology

Pathology Quiz Case 1

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):410. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.48-a

Pathology Quiz Case 3: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):410-415. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.50-b

Pathology Quiz Case 2

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):411. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.49-a

Pathology Quiz Case 3

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):412. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.50-a

Pathology Quiz Case 3

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):412. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.50-a

Pathology Quiz Case 1: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):413. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.48-b

Pathology Quiz Case 3: Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):415. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.50-b
About the Cover

Painted Island in the Venetian Lagoon

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):317. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.47
Original Article

Sialoendoscopy: Prognostic Factors for Endoscopic Removal of Salivary Stones

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):325-329. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.238
ObjectiveTo detect prognostic factors for successful sialoendoscopic removal of salivary stones.DesignRetrospective case series.SettingTertiary referral hospital.PatientsForty-nine consecutive patients who underwent sialoendoscopy for sialolithiasis between January 1, 2008, and January 1, 2010, at University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.InterventionsDiagnostic and interventional sialoendoscopy using local anesthesia.Main Outcome MeasuresStone removal rate, size, mobility, shape, and location, as well as clinical follow-up data.ResultsSixty-one percent (39 of 64) of all salivary stones were removed endoscopically. The cutoff point for endoscopic removal was between 5 and 6 mm in stone diameter. Small size, good mobility, round or oval, and distal location of a salivary stone were positive prognostic factors for sialoendoscopic removal, with sialolith mobility having the greatest effect in multivariate analysis.ConclusionSmall size, good mobility, round or oval, and distal location of a salivary stone in the main duct predict significantly greater probability of endoscopic removal and consequently are positive prognostic factors.

Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: Predictors of Prognosis

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):331-337. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.46

Botulinum Toxin A for Treatment of Sialorrhea in Children: An Effective, Minimally Invasive Approach

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):339-344. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.240
ObjectivesTo report (1) our experience with botulinum toxin A injections into the salivary glands of pediatric patients with sialorrhea, (2) the clinical outcomes of these interventions, and (3) the associated complication rates.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingUrban pediatric hospital and pediatric rehabilitation center.PatientsForty-five neurologically impaired children.InterventionsPatients received botulinum toxin A intrasalivary injections between January 2004 and May 2008 at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. All patients received sedation or general anesthesia for their botulinum toxin A injections, which were performed using ultrasonographic guidance.Main Outcome MeasuresPosttreatment assessments included the duration of effect, patient complications, saliva consistency, caregiver willingness to repeat the treatment, caregiver satisfaction with the treatment, and caregiver overall assessment of the child's posttreatment quality of life.ResultsForty-five subjects received a total of 91 botulinum toxin A treatments. The mean (SD) duration of effect was 4.6 (5.2) months. Duration of effect (log transformed) was significantly negatively associated with saliva quantity (P = .02), and there was a positive association with both increasing age and female sex, although neither reached statistical significance (P = .08 for each). Seven of the 24 documented complications were major, according to the Society of Interventional Radiology Classification System for Complications by Outcome scale. Thirty-six of the caregivers reported that this treatment improved the child's quality of life (80%).ConclusionUltrasonographically guided botulinum toxin A injections into the salivary glands are safe and efficacious in the management of sialorrhea in children with neurologic disorders.

Conservative Management of Acute Mastoiditis in Children

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):346-350. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.29

How Airway Venous Malformations Differ From Airway Infantile Hemangiomas

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):352-357. doi:10.1001/archoto.2010.243
ObjectiveTo compare airway infantile hemangiomas (IHs) and venous malformations (VMs) clinically, radiographically, endoscopically, and histologically.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingTertiary care pediatric hospital.PatientsThe study included patients seen in the Vascular Anomaly Clinic, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, between 2001 and 2008.MethodsAll patients with airway vascular anomalies were identified by searching the Vascular Anomaly Quality Improvement Database and hospital discharge data. The data, which were analyzed with descriptive statistics and the Fisher exact test, included presenting age, sex, presenting signs, lesion site, and radiographic, endoscopic, and histologic findings..ResultsSeventeen patients with airway lesions were identified, 6 with VMs and 11 with IHs. Patients with VMs presented at a mean (SD) age of 11.3 (13.7) months (age range, 3-39 months), while those with IHs presented at 3 (1.8) months of age (age range, 1-6 months) (P = .03). The patients with IHs were predominantly female (9 of 11 [81%]), while no sex difference was noted among the patients with VMs (3 of 6 [50%]). All patients with IHs presented with stridor and cutaneous lesions, whereas patients with VMs more often presented with hemoptysis or dysphagia (P = .001). Computed tomographic angiograms demonstrated enhancing endolaryngeal lesions in all IHs, while VMs enhanced poorly. Endoscopically, IHs were transglottic, while VMs were postcricoid or epiglottic (P < .001). Histologically, immunostained lesions showed submucosal lobules of capillaries lined by GLUT-1 (glucose transporter isoform 1)–positive endothelium in IHs, whereas VMs consisted of loosely organized venous channels that lacked GLUT-1 staining.ConclusionPatients with airway IHs and VMs differ in presenting age and signs, sex, airway lesion location, enhancement on computed tomographic angiograms, and histologic appearance.

Usefulness of Airway Evaluation in Infants Initially Seen With an Apparent Life-Threatening Event

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):359-362. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.37

Pediatric Tracheotomy Wound Complications: Incidence and Significance

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):363-366. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.33

Association of Asthma With Clinically Aggressive Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):368-372. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.44

Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Surgery on Middle Ear Function

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):373-376. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.53

Patient Adjustment to Reduced Olfactory Function

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):377-382. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.32

Histologic Characteristics and Mucin Immunohistochemistry of Cystic Fibrosis Sinus Mucosa

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):383-389. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.34

Central Auditory Dysfunction as a Harbinger of Alzheimer Dementia

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):390-395. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.28
Letters to the Editor

Hemorrhagic Complications Following Esophageal Button Battery Ingestion

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):416. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.36

Hemorrhagic Complications Following Esophageal Button Battery Ingestion

Abstract Full Text
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(4):416-417. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.39
×