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July 1918

IS THE AMOUNT OF CALCIUM USUALLY GIVEN IN DILUTIONS OF COW'S MILK INJURIOUS TO INFANTS?A REPLY TO THE ARTICLE ON "CALCIUM IN ITS RELATION TO THE ABSORPTION OF FATTY ACIDS," BY BOSWORTH, BOWDITCH AND GIBLIN, IN THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISEASES OF CHILDREN, JUNE, 1918

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Laboratories of the Babies' Hospital and the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York.

Am J Dis Child. 1918;16(1):52-56. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1918.01910130059008
Abstract

The claim is made by Bosworth, Bowditch and Giblin that by the use of a special "reconstructed" or "declacified" milk, infants who are artificially fed will have a no greater excretion of fat in the feces than those fed at the breast. The position is taken that this special milk provides an improved form of feeding over simple cow's milk dilutions, because on the latter, children suffer a serious loss of fat through the excretion of soap stools; also that there follows from such feeding excessive constipation, leading frequently to a general upset, termed by the authors a "blowup."

We have had no opportunity to study Bosworth's decalcified milk and its effects; but we desire to present some conclusions drawn from results obtained in this laboratory which may perhaps allay the fears of calcium injury from the use of simple dilutions of cow's milk in infant feeding.

There are three

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