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September 1919

A CASE OF DIABETES INSIPIDUS IN A GIRL OF TEN YEARS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF ENDOCRINAL INVOLVEMENT

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Pediatrics and Contagious Diseases, University of Michigan Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1919;18(3):194-198. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1919.04110330044006
Abstract

Janet, T., aged 10 years, entered the pediatric service of the University Hospital, April 17, 1919, complaining of excessive appetite for water. Aside from an attack of measles when 6 years of age, and whooping cough at 7 years of age, she has always been well. Of late she has not been gaining normally in weight, and her appetite for food is poor. A careful consideration of the family and birth history, Wassermann and tuberculin (subcutaneous) tests enables us to rule out syphilis and tuberculosis as possible etiologic factors. There is no history of injury.

Two years ago, the mother noticed that the child passed an unusually large amount of urine, and that she was very thirsty. These symptoms have gradually increased so that now she frequently passes five or six quarts of urine daily. Since entering the hospital, the largest quantity of urine voided was 5,180 c.c. (5% quarts);

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