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October 1919

CERTAIN NUTRITIONAL DISORDERS OF CHILDREN ASSOCIATED WITH A PUTREFACTIVE INTESTINAL FLORA

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics and the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, University of California Medical School, San Francisco, Calif.

Am J Dis Child. 1919;18(4):254-268. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1919.04110340033004
Abstract

It has long been recognized that the intestinal flora of the very young varies, and that the character of the ingested food is one factor in the production of this variation. The description of acidophilic, gram-positive organisms in the stools of breast fed infants by Escherich1 and Moro1 are classic, and the same authors, as well as Bahart,1 Giarre,1 Concetti1 and Schikora,1 with equal clearness have described bacteria to be found in the stools of artificially fed infants. Thus it has been common knowledge for many years that infants fed a diet rich in bovine milk acquire a characteristic stool flora which in contrast to that of the nursling is putrefactive in its activities and which produces chemical substances (indol, phenol, skatol, etc.) which are known to arise from the splitting of protein. Giarre,1 Schikora,1 Langstein,1 Soldin1 and Bookman1

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