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July 1922

THYMUS APOPLEXY: AN UNUSUAL MANIFESTATION OF HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE OF THE NEWLY BORN

Am J Dis Child. 1922;24(1):27-43. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1922.04120070030003
Abstract

The thymus gland is richly supplied with blood vessels1 which are readily engorged and often contribute considerably to the enlargement of the gland.2 This congestion is especially apt to occur whenever there is a general circulatory stasis.3 There is little supporting tissue for the rich network of capillaries in and about the individual lobules so that hemorrhages occur readily.3 These may be scattered, small and petechial in character, or they may appear as large effusions of blood localized or diffused throughout the substance of the organ. The former are common, especially in asphyxial conditions, in acute infections and in hemorrhagic diseases. The latter are relatively rare and were first noted by Friedleben4 in his basic monograph in which he applied the term "Apoplexien" to these more extensive hemorrhages. Such an "apoplexy" may follow the hyperemia associated with simple hyperplasia of the gland and may give

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