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February 1923

ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC ENCEPHALITIS: REPORT OF A CASE FOLLOWING SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, Western Reserve University, and the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1923;25(2):98-106. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920020015003
Abstract

The comparative infrequency of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis as a sequela of scarlet fever, the clinical picture presented, and the unusually rapid course of the case here recorded, with fatal termination, are points of sufficient interest to justify a rather detailed report.

REPORT OF CASE  History.—E. G., boy, white, aged 6 years, was admitted, July 31, 1922, suffering from convulsions. The mother stated that until three days previously he had apparently been in good health since he had had scarlet fever. He had been active in play, and had made no complaint. July 28 he complained of sore eyes, avoided light, and had some apparent stiffness of the right leg. A physician was summoned, and, following treatment, there was some improvement. The next day he vomited everything taken by mouth, was feverish, and the mother noted that he seemed drowsy and had a squint. At this time there was rigidity

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