[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
April 1923

TRANSFUSION THROUGH THE UMBILICAL VEIN IN HEMORRHAGE OF THE NEW-BORN: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Attending Pediatrician, James Walker Hospital; Consulting Pediatrician, Community Hospital (Colored); Attending Pediatrician, Babies' Hospital, Wrightsville, N. C. WILMINGTON, N. C.

Am J Dis Child. 1923;25(4):290-296. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920040035003
Abstract

The use of human blood as a therapeutic agent in melena or humorrhagic disease of the new-born has been one of the gratifying advances in medicine during the last decade. Human blood has acted as a specific in this condition.

HISTORY  The first transfusion of blood for hemorrhagic disease of the new-born was performed in New York City by Dr. Alexis Carrel in 1908.1 The method was direct transfusion from the left radial artery to the right popliteal vein. The baby recovered. In 1909 Dr. Crile introduced the cuff and cannula method. In 1910 the Elsberg cannula was introduced, and, during the same year, Vincent of Boston introduced the method employing the paraffin coated glass tubes.In 1913 Lindemann aroused considerable interest in transfusion by introducing the syringe method, which simplified the procedure and, at the same time, gave a method by means of which the quantity given could

×