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October 1923

SUBDURAL EFFUSION AND INTERNAL HYDROCEPHALUS: STUDY OF A CASE, WITH RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons NEW YORK

Am J Dis Child. 1923;26(4):383-390. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.04120160096010
Abstract

The work of recent experimenters, notably Dandy and Weed, has greatly increased our knowledge of fluid circulation within the cranial cavity, providing exact means for the study of cases of hydrocephalus. Application of these methods to each individual problem will frequently point the way to successful therapeutic attack. The case to be presented here was at first indistinguishable from that of a simple obstructive internal hydrocephalus. During the months that it was necessary to keep the patient in the Presbyterian Hospital, I was much indebted to Dr. Howard Mason for help and counsel.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —J. P., an Italian boy, was born of healthy parents at full term, after an easy labor. There were no tuberculous contacts. At 7 months, he began to creep. About this time, there appeared a purulent discharge from the left ear. At 9 months, the first tooth appeared, and the infant was trying

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