[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
November 1925

A FREQUENT CAUSE OF DYSPEPSIA IN BREAST FED INFANTS

Author Affiliations

OSLO, NORWAY
From the Wards and Outpatient Department of the Children's Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Norway.

Am J Dis Child. 1925;30(5):642-645. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1925.01920170046003
Abstract

Quite frequently, one observes breast fed infants who, after doing well for the first few weeks or months of life, stop gaining in weight, and become restless and irritable. The stools are either small and dark colored, or frequent, loose and foul smelling. Mucus and fat curds may be present. Vomiting, occasionally severe, may be a predominating symptom. Ultimately these infants lose weight, and unless proper treatment is instituted they become distinctly athreptic. The symptoms enumerated are commonly designated by the term "dyspepsia."

CAUSE  Overfeeding at the breast has been considered a frequent cause of the symptoms observed, especially in those infants in whom diarrhea has been a prominent symptom. It is undoubtedly true that breast fed infants occasionally receive more milk than is necessary to cover their requirements, but in such cases the infant usually spits up a certain amount and continues to thrive. In my experience, overfeeding with

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×