[Skip to Navigation]
Other Articles
January 1926

WHEAL FORMATION IN INFANTS AND IN CHILDREN: II. IN RICKETS AND SPASMOPHILIA WITH LOW SERUM CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Babies' and Children's Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics of Western Reserve University and Lakeside Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1926;31(1):96-100. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1926.04130010103012
Abstract

The effect of calcium on vessel permeability has been the subject of much investigation, the results of which, however, have not always been in accord. The question has recently been thoroughly reviewed in Loeb's1 excellent monograph on "Edema," and need not be detailed here. It is rather generally accepted that calcium usually lessens the severity of inflammatory skin reactions by irritants such as croton oil, and that it lessens the permeability of cell membranes, although Fleisher, Hoyt and Loeb1 state that calcium does not influence in a noticeable degree the elimination of fluid from the blood vessels. A more recent research by Tainter and Hanzlik2 has shown that large subcutaneous or intravenous doses of calcium chlorid had no effect on the development of edema of the face and neck in rabbits from paraphenylenediamin. It has been maintained, notably by Hamburger,8 that other constituents being constant it

Add or change institution
×