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August 1926

COAGULATION TIME AND BLEEDING TIME IN THE NEW-BORN: EFFECT OF PROPHYLACTIC INJECTIONS OF BLOOD

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Pediatrics. Mavo Clinic.

Am J Dis Child. 1926;32(2):200-207. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1926.04130080040004
Abstract

Hemorrhage is considered the most frequent cause of death during the first week of life. In 65 per cent of all infants dying within five months, Schwartz1 found gross signs of trauma sustained in the brain at birth, that is, hemorrhage or softening that could be discerned with the naked eye. In 50 per cent of mature infants and in 40 per cent of premature infants, Cruickshank2 found gross signs of hemorrhage in the brain. He concludes from his figures that many new-born infants with quite extensive hemorrhage survive. Ylppö,3 in examining the bodies of premature infants, concluded that the smaller the infant the higher was the percentage of hemorrhage. In infants weighing less than 1,000 Gm., the incidence of hemorrhage was 90 per cent, and in those weighing between 2,000 and 3,000 Gm. it was only 28 per cent. He followed 322 prematurely born children up

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