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Progress in Pediatrics
April 1927

GONORRHEAL VULVOVAGINITIS IN THE YOUNG: HISTORY, PREVALENCE, TREATMENT AND CASE REPORTS

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Department of Gynecology, Georgetown University.

Am J Dis Child. 1927;33(4):630-646. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1927.04130160082008
Abstract

In order to understand gonorrheal infection in the young, it must be stated that though it is described for the sake of convenience as it appears in men, women and children, the same process underlies the subject as a whole.

Children, as will be seen later, become infected through indiscriminate contact with adults. For this reason it is intended to show briefly that history is rich in examples of how gonorrhea affects first man, then the child.

HISTORY  The exact period at which gonorrhea began to affect mankind is unknown. It was well known and prevalent among ancient civilizations. In classic writings as early as 300 B. C., there are constant references to it, by such men as Hippocrates, Aristotle, Seneca and Plato. It was known to the ancient Hebrews. In the book of Leviticus xv, 2 and 3 (about 1490 B. C.) is this passage: "Speak unto the children

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