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September 1927

GASTRIC DIGESTION: THE RELATION OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION VOLUME AND BUFFER CAPACITY OF THE GASTRIC CONTENTS TO A MILK TEST MEAL

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN; NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Pediatrics, and the New Haven Hospital, Yale University.

Am J Dis Child. 1927;34(3):429-440. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1927.04130210104012
Abstract

Studies in the chemistry of gastric digestion have centered about the acidity and action of the enzymes. It was early shown that in infancy a small amount of free hydrochloric acid is found in the gastric contents of the breast-fed infant, but none in those of artificially fed infants. No great progress was made until methods for measuring the hydrogen ion concentration were introduced. For the last twenty years, this has been the dominant interest in gastric analysis.1

Much of value lies in some of the older literature, a review of which, to 1908, was given by Clarke.2 Motility was subject to measurement as soon as the Kussmaul tube was first used for infants by Epstein in 1880.3 His observations were confirmed and extended by Leo,4 who showed that breast milk passed out of the stomach more rapidly than cow's milk. As a possible correlation, he

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