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July 1928

AURICULAR FIBRILLATION IN CHILDREN: ITS RELATION TO RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; LOUISVILLE, KY.
From the Service of Dr. B. S. Oppenheimer, the Medical Division of the Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases, New York. Read before the Section of Pediatrics, New York Academy of Medicine, Dec. 8, 1927.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;36(1):22-39. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920250029003
Abstract

Incidence

Clinical Classification

Paroxysmal Auricular Fibrillation

Terminal Auricular Fibrillation

Chronic Auricular Fibrillation

Comment

(a) Extrinsic Factors and the Development of Auricular Fibrillation

(b) Acute Rheumatic Fever and the Development of Auricular Fibrillation

(c) Mitral Stenosis and the Development of Auricular Fibrillation

(d) Digitalis and the Development of Auricular Fibrillation

Differential Diagnosis

Treatment

Prognosis

Conclusions

Auricular fibrillation has been considered an unusual and infrequent type of irregularity in children during the course of rheumatic fever.1 Modern texts in pediatrics fail to mention its relative importance in the acute phase of the disease or its occurrence as a complication of long standing cardiac involvement.2 A summary of the literature since the introduction of the electrocardiograph seems to confirm this belief concerning the apparent rarity of this irregularity in children with rheumatic heart disease.3 Only nine of the thirteen cases reported in children under the age of 11 with auricular

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