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July 1928

ISO-AGGLUTININS IN THE NEW-BORN: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR PLACENTAL TRANSMISSION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College and the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;36(1):54-69. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920250061005
Abstract

It was demonstrated by von Decastello and Sturli,1 Happ2 and others that at birth the blood group of the infant is rarely established. Normally, the agglutinogens appear before the iso-agglutinins and by the end of the first year the blood grouping is usually complete.

The presence of iso-agglutinins in the blood from the umbilical cord raises the question as to their origin, whether they are a product of the biologic activity of the fetus or whether they have been transmitted from the mother by way of the placenta. If the iso-agglutinins find their source in the maternal circulation, observations as to their fate in the blood of the new-born would prove of interest. This consideration involves not alone the problem of placental permeability but the relationship of iso-agglutinins of the cord blood to the later development of blood groups by the infant.

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