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Case Reports
March 1929

BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN ANEMIC INFANTS WITH PNEUMONIA

Author Affiliations

WILMINGTON, DEL.

Am J Dis Child. 1929;37(3):596-599. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930030138015
Abstract

The intravenous administration of any appreciable quantity of fluid in pneumonia has usually been considered a hazardous procedure. Few have had the courage to risk a greater load on an already overtaxed myocardium and pulmonary circulation. Antipneumococcus serum in a normal saline diluent, totaling about 100 cc. per dose given to adults, has been perhaps the largest quantity of any therapeutic agent used. The transfusion of blood has received little attention in the literature and has not met with favor. Cross1 advised intraperitoneal transfusion in bronchitis, lobar pneumonia and bronchopneumonia "where intravenous transfusions are contra-indicated." Carlton2 concluded from his treatment of about thirty patients with bronchopneumonia and an appreciable number with lobarpneumonia that intravenous transfusion is of no benefit. He did not mention any harmful effects, however; nor did he mention the presence of anemia in any of the cases. Sir Humphrey Rolleston3 and others did not

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