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Case Reports
April 1929

PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS ENTEROCOLITIS AND MASTOIDITIS ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTION WITH MORGAN'S BACILLUS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1929;37(4):814-817. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930040123008
Abstract

In his original work on summer diarrhea in London, Morgan1 described a bacillus isolated from the intestinal contents in twenty-eight of fifty-eight cases, which was gram-negative, motile, a producer of acid and slight gas in dextrose, levulose and galactose broths, not reacting with the other sugars, and forming indol in peptone beef broth. The bacillus was demonstrated to be pathogenic when fed to rats and rabbits. Bacilli giving the same cultural reactions have since been reported by several others as associated with or causing enteritis. The agglutination reactions2 have proved to be of little if any value in their identification, presumably due to the occurrence of different strains. The conclusion of Dick, Dick and Williams,3 that the epidemic of enteritis associated with mastoiditis which they observed in infants was primarily an intestinal infection due to Morgan's dysentery bacillus, has prompted the report of the following case:

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