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June 1929

THE RELATION OF RATE OF GROWTH IN INFANTS TO DIET

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Nutrition, Child Welfare Research Station, State University of Iowa.

Am J Dis Child. 1929;37(6):1177-1186. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930060054007
Abstract

It is well known by students of animal nutrition that among the lower animals the physical measurements of individuals of a given species can be considerably altered by changes in the amount and kind of the various components of the diet. Whether the norms of growth of the human body can be modified by such means is not known definitely. It seems probable, however, that as more is learned concerning the quantitative biologic needs of the human organism, and this knowledge is incorporated into daily living, the present standards of height and weight may become considerably changed, particularly in regard to children. Undoubtedly, there is a "fairly definite upper limit of body size that is fixed by heredity,"1 but that the present accepted averages are at all indicative of this upper limit is questionable. The physical measurements of the group of intellectually gifted children in California, reported by Baldwin,

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